Tuesday, 3 May 2011

Evaluation Question One. In what ways does your media product use, develop or challenge forms and conventions of real media products?

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Conventions of a Thriller

 Thrillers use  suspense, tension, and excitement as the main elements, and common methods in crime thrillers are mainly ransoms, captivities, heists, revenge and kidnappings. Absent doesnt draw on any particular reason for the disapearance, but instead leaves it anonymous with the intention of building suspence for the rest of the film. This is a typical development of many thriller films, in which the opening is left slightly vague in order to capture the audiences attention and excitement.

Other films and the media dealing with disappearances
  • 2010 Thriller "The Scouting Book For Boys" produced by Celador Films distributed by Pathe, followed a similiar narrative to Absent, focusing on the reaction to the disappearance of a shop workers daughter. This co-insidently has a similar style of setting, being shot along the coastline.
  • 2008 Crime Drame "Taken" and was all about a former spy who has to rely on his old skills to save his estranged daughter, who has been forced into the slave trade

  • 2006 British Thriller " London to Brighton" featuring a young girl who runs away to the beaches of Brighton. Also a very low-budget film with total costs of only £500,000




  • 1973 British Mystery "Dont Look Now" - about a couple who's daughter drowns and local sisters claim to be in contact with her spirit. featuring a little girl in a red coat!
  • Disappearance of Madeleine Mcann- Little girl disappeared whilst on holiday in 2007 and was never found. Portuguese criminal investigation police launch a global search but she is never found. Years to follow, the media continue to publish the family's devistation
  • Beaumont children disappearance- The three siblings who disappeared off a beach in Australia in 1966. Their case resulted in one of the largest police investigations in Australian criminal history and remains one of Australia's most infamous cold cases.

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